A History of Muslims in America

 

INTRODUCTION

This curriculum was designed to supplement content standards in social studies and world history as it relates to the study of American history. The curriculum is made up of eight individual lesson plans, each of which focuses on different parts of the accompanying digital presentation, A History of Muslims in America. Each lesson includes detailed notes that describe each slide in the presentation. In addition to the notes, each lesson also features post-presentation discussion and test questions. The curriculum also includes links to related films accompanied by follow-up questions. Each lesson concludes with further resources and references.

LESSON ONE: MUSLIMS AND AMERICA, A LONG HISTORY

The first lesson emphasizes the fact that Muslims are not new to America, but came here along with early European explorers and settlers. Muslims were explicitly referenced by America’s founding fathers, such as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. They viewed them as potential citizens with rights and obligations no different from those of other Americans. Muslim immigrants and converts have helped to build America along with countless other groups of people. This little-known history is an important part of the larger narrative and history of this country.

LESSON THREE: ENSLAVED WEST AFRICAN MUSLIMS

This lesson describes the experiences of West African Muslims enslaved during the period of the Atlantic Slave Trade. It highlights some of the well-documented stories of West African Muslims enslaved in the United States, and their responses to slavery. These include such notable West African Muslims as Yarrow Mamout and Abdul Rahman ibn Ibrahim Sori. While some responded to slavery with accommodation, others worked for their freedom, or resisted in other ways.  Many of these people were distinctive in terms of their cosmopolitan backgrounds and often their literacy.

 

Join the Discussion

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

arrow